Fri, Aug. 2nd, 2013 · Mercy Lounge · $10/$20/$30 (minimum donation)

After The Fire: A Benefit for Luella and the Sun

ft. Luella and the Sun, Justin Townes Earle & many more

Fri, Aug. 2nd, 2013

After The Fire: A Benefit for Luella and the Sun

ft. Luella and the Sun, Justin Townes Earle & many more

$10/$20/$30 (minimum donation)
Doors: 7:30pm
Show: 8:00pm
Ages: 18+
Mercy Lounge

Fri, Aug. 2nd, 2013

Mercy Lounge
Doors: 7:30pm
Show: 8:00pm
Ages: 18+
$10/$20/$30 (minimum donation)
Get Tickets


177 Attending

After The Fire: A Benefit for Luella and the Sun

ft. Luella and the Sun, Justin Townes Earle & many more

AFTER THE FIRE - A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR LUELLA AND THE SUN

Featuring

Luella and the Sun - Justin Townes Earle - Altered Statesman - DUGAS - Los Colognes - Webb Wilder - James Wallace and the Naked Light & more

 

MINIMUM DONATIONS:

$10 general admission

$20 admission + autographed Luella and the Sun 10” Vinyl

$30 admission + Limited Edition Archival Print

 

All proceeds to benefit Luella and the Sun

Can't come but want to make a donation anyway? Go to www.luellaandthesun.com 

 

SPONSORED BY 

No Country For New Nashville - GoodBAMMSho - East Nashville Underground - Do615 - Mercy Lounge - Lightning 100 - Grimey's - Thirty Tigers - Silly Goose -  Five Points Pizza - The East Nashvillian - Native - All Eyes Media - Cage Free Visuals - Midtown Printing - Revival Vineyards - Leinenkugel’s - Blue Moon

Luella and the Sun


→ Official Website

"Luella and the Sun deconstructs Gospel, distills its soulful essence and uses that to infuse raw, gritty garage rock with an unholy wildness that feels as righteous as it is dangerous." - Alli Marshall for Mountain Xpress 5.8.13

 

Luella and the Sun, one of Nashville, TN’s must see emerging acts defies any singular description.   Regardless of how they are characterized, one certain thing is that their sound ignites a soulful blend of blues-hop, gospel and rock, merging a fearless sense of abandon and equal parts restraint.   The band deftly works as a unit and every note has purpose, combining minimalist attitude with raw emotion - and even in their most unguarded moments, there's a smoldering vulnerability that's unquestionably mesmerizing.  Quickly capturing the attention of the music community, Luella and the Sun is a band that you do not want to miss. 

 

The band are currently touring in support of their 10" vinyl release.  More videos coming in 2013 and a full-length in route for 2014.

 

"Nashville's Luella and the Sun approach the blues and gospel-soul as if these traditions were the food of the gods and they haven't eaten for a week.  Luella herself has a ferocious, feminine voice, and performs with zero fear."   By Ann Powers NPR

Justin Townes Earle


→ Official Website

On a rainy Nashville Thursday in October 2011, Justin Townes Earle leapt onstage at the famed Ryman Auditorium to accept the Americana Music Award for Song of the Year. The triumphant evening capped a turbulent twelve months for the gifted young musician categorized by significant hardship as well as notable achievement including debut performances at New York’s Carnegie Hall and on The Late Show with David Letterman.

Just one week later, Earle retreated to the western mountains of North Carolina to record his next album, Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now – an intriguing title given the importance of change in Earle’s approach to art. “I think it’s the job of the artist to be in transition and constantly learning more,” he says. “The new record is completely different than my last one, Harlem River Blues. This time I’ve gone in a Memphis-soul direction.”

Those who’ve followed Earle’s growth since releasing his debut EP Yuma in 2007 won’t be surprised he’s shooting off in another direction. For an artist whose list of influences runs the gamut from Randy Newman to Woody Guthrie, Chet Baker to the Replacements, and Phil Ochs to Bruce Springsteen, categories are useless.

“Great songs are great songs,” Earle says. “If you listen to a lot of soul music, especially the Stax Records stuff, the chord progressions are just like country music. And just like country music, soul music began in the church, so it has its roots in the same place.”

Perhaps then it’s also not surprising Earle chose a converted church in Asheville, NC to record Nothing’s Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now. Recorded completely live (no overdubs) over a four-day period with Harlem River Blues co-producer Skylar Wilson, the album sheds the rockabilly bravado of previous records in favor of a confident, raw, and vulnerable sound. Says Earle, “the whole idea was to record everything live, making everything as real as it could be, and putting something out there that will hopefully stand the test of time and space.”

The result: songs like “Down on the Lower East Side” and “Unfortunately, Anna” are equally timely and timeless. The former finds Earle channeling his Closing Time era Tom Waits while the latter echoes the dirges of Springsteen’s Darkness on the Edge of Town. That said, gentle heartbreakers like the album’s title track and “Am I That Lonely Tonight” are uniquely Earle, solidifying his role as one of this generation’s greatest songwriters.

Altered Statesman


→ Label Site

At the time of its migration to Ohio, Steve Poulton, leader of the Altered Statesman, was a member of Birddog, a stripped-down folk outfit led by Kentuckian Bill Stanton. Poulton recorded two albums with the group before leaving to devote more time to his own projects. It's a good thing he finally made the move because the talented musician has been hiding in the shadows of other performers for too long.

Poulton first gained indie rock fame in the early '90s as bass player for Paul K & the Weathermen. The Kentucky-based outfit led by junkie song-writer Paul Kopasz never achieved commercial success status but the critic's darlings made a decent run for it. The Weathermen toured Europe a half dozen times and released a string of acclaimed LPs on Dutch label SilenZ and now-defunct American indie Homestead. Poulton, who joined the Weathermen at age 19, remained with the group for seven years.

The Altered Statesman has released a pair of discs that Poulton and Byrne duplicate themselves on CD-Rs and sell at shows and via the Internet. The collection of four-track recordings is a continuation of the electronic bent of Poulton's early live performances. The group is also finishing up tracks for an upcoming single. This will mark the vinyl debut of theAltered Statesman and will also be the first release featuring the new rhythm section of Chris Koltay (Sistern) and Joe Burns, a pair of musicians and studio engineers from Cincinnati. 

DUGAS


→ Official Website

Hailing from the French quarters of Winnipeg, Canada, Sarah and Christian Dugas grew up on a varied regimen of vinyl records, courtesy of their musician parents. While never denying their wide-ranging musical tastes, they vicariously immersed themselves in Southern music and this unmistakable connection expanded into a full-blown musical path.  After lending their services to the Canadian Juno-winning and Grammy-nominated band The Duhks for several years, these siblings are finally realizing the dream of launching their own project. Still deeply rooted in Southern music and culture, their sound draws from Roots, Rock and old school Soul. They bring a hard-hitting, dynamic and heart-felt energy to their diverse original compositions, improvisations and a few chosen covers - all of it, delivered with the awe-inspiring vocal and musical chemistry only seen amongst siblings. They are currently working on their debut album, to be released by Zac Brown's Southern Ground Artists label. 

Los Colognes


→ Official Website

Aaron Mortenson and Jay Rutherford set out to make their debut Los Colognes album in the mold of the great JJ Cale records of the 70s. Working Together is parched desert country blues at its best—full of relationships gone south, one-liners that make you think twice, and slow-burning boogie woogie.

Driving to Nashville in 2010, Jay and Mort pulled out an old cassette tape with a funny label on it. “The Clones,” it read, an almost forgotten four-track recording from Mort’s uncle, circa late 70s—an unreleased mash-up of country and gospel music. Something about it felt right, so the duo appropriated the name for their new band.

When they got to Nashville, the Chicago singer-guitarist and drummer set up shop at the weekly East Nashville late night jam at The 5 Spot. It was here they built a forum for a rotating cast of Nashville musicians to come sit in. “It’s kind of harking back to the old Nashville—a singer, song, session cats, producers putting bands together on the fly,” says Jay. The core members including Micah Hulscher on keys and Gordon Persha on bass would soon be drafted as the backing players for Nashville artists like Rayland Baxter, Nikki Lane, and Kevin Gordon.

After a name change and three years tightening their sound and soaking up the remaining strains of classic country music in Nashville, Los Colognes’ Working Together reflects the simple but straight-on lyricism of John Prine, the unhurried grooves of Cale, with a touch Mark Knopfler’s mid-‘80s Dire Straits polish. “Just stay on the train until you feel like you got enough,” explains Mort on the band’s recording studio philosophy. The duo would bring in different players on each session, then take the tapes home to work on them some more, blending in a “soupy, random quality,” says Jay.

Working Together deals with what they joke is “the East Nashville ethos”—questions of getting older and settling down.

On the reggae opener, “King Size Bed,” with its long “Brothers In Arms”-esque intro, a woman calls out her lover—“Your king size bed has gone to your head / You thought I was sleeping but I heard what you said / You said I’d never even know you were gone”—before he tiptoes off into the night.

On "Working Together, " the album’s first single, Jay sings about trading off domestic duties. “Honey, I’ll grant your wishes, if you mow the yard,” he sings, over an impossibly feel-good summer groove. “Working together is easy, but living together is hard,” he admits, though Los Colognes make living look pretty easy.

“My favorite writers, like Cale and Prine, it’s that little twist that makes them great,” says Jay. “It’s like a good blues song—you don’t need 15 lines. You need four really good ones,” adds Mort, who acts as Jay’s lyrical filter and shares songwriting credit on the album.

Working Together’s last song, “Bird of Paradise,” creates a hazy, ambient dreamscape to end the record. “You’re a bird of paradise flying over me,” sings Jay. “I’m an ancient beach, you’re the tide / Nobody knows if it’s low or it’s high.”

Though Working Together deals with the unraveling of one particular relationship, Los Colognes have distilled things here to their universal core. After a decades-long musical partnership—writing 500 shitty songs together, Mort jokes, and fully finding their sound—this is the good stuff.

Webb Wilder


→ Official Website

The Webb Wilder character was created for a short film about a backwoods private detective who fell out of the '50s and happened to also be a musician. With his group, Wilder combines the surf guitar of the Ventures with the rock roots of Duane Eddy, drawing on the feel of both country music and film noir. Though sometimes bordering on the gimmicky, the band is quite humorous yet plays serious music. It Came from Nashville featured a cover of Steve Earle's "Devil's Right Hand," appropriate because, like Earle, Wilder rocked too hard to be country but kept a twang that might put off mainstream rock fans. Wilder's next two albums didn't necessarily forge new ground but refined the band's sound somewhat, making its R&B influence more apparent. In concert, Wilder often gives stream-of-consciousness recitations that touch on motor homes, voodoo, television, and other somewhat kitschy subjects; usually they're funny enough to work. An example of his live show, Born to Be Wilder, appeared in 2008 from Blind Pig Records. More Like Me followed in 2009, again from the Blind Pig label. ~ Robert Gordon, Rovi

James Wallace and the Naked Light


→ Official Site

It was once said that James Wallace is the kind of guy you'd want on your side if you ever got into a music fight in prison. He'd probably tell you that too, just to clarify his position on not getting into a real fight in prison. That said, his penchant for dark and clever wordplay above eerily-cheery melodies, begs there may be a few twisted stories from his past that we've yet to hear.