Fri, Feb. 21st, 2014 · Mercy Lounge · $20-$25 adv | $25 DOS

The Black Angels with Roky Erickson

& Golden Angels

Fri, Feb. 21st, 2014

The Black Angels with Roky Erickson

& Golden Angels

$20-$25 adv | $25 DOS
Doors: 9:00pm
Show: 10:00pm
Ages: 18+
Mercy Lounge

Fri, Feb. 21st, 2014

Mercy Lounge
Doors: 9:00pm
Show: 10:00pm
Ages: 18+
$20-$25 adv | $25 DOS
Get Tickets


The Black Angels with Roky Erickson

& Golden Angels

The Black Angels


→ Official Website

THE BLACK ANGELS

 

Alex Maas – vocals, bass, organ/drone machine

Christian Bland – guitar, drone machine/organ

Kyle Hunt – keyboards, percussion, bass, guitar 

Stephanie Bailey – drums, percussion

 

The Black Angels’ most revelatory collection thus far, Indigo Meadow marks the Austin, Texas-based band’s fourth full-length release, following 2010’s acclaimed Phosphene Dream. Once again The Black Angels prove themselves the undisputed avatars of contemporary psychedelic rock, simultaneously exalting the genre’s kaleidoscopic past as they thrust it ever further into the future. 

Now a quartet, the band – with the able support of producer John Congleton (David Byrne & St. Vincent, Clinic, Explosions In The Sky) – have brought new focus to their wide-ranging songcraft, their righteous riffs and dogmatic drones gaining increased power as they fuel a more expansive emotional trajectory.  The ominous organ grooves and carpet-bombing beats still resonate with feral rush and napalm fire, but songs like “Love Me Forever” and the bottomless blue title track see more than a little light piercing the Black Angels’ notorious heart of darkness.  

“There’s a different feel to it than any of our other records, “ says singer/multi-instrumentalist Alex Maas.  “It still has those ‘What the hell’s going on?’ moments, but when you’re having a psych experience, you don’t want it to be dark all the time.  That’s not where you want to be.” 

Phosphene Dream was followed by two years of nearly non-stop touring, a thrilling, often grueling run that by its end saw the band’s roster diminished but their spirit restored. The Black Angels closed the circle and in January 2012 they convened to begin writing and woodshedding new material.  The next few months turned out to be the most artistically fecund of the band’s career, their fresh energy unlocking an abundance of songs and intriguing musical options.

“A weight was lifted off of us,” guitarist Christian Bland says.  “It’s like ESP when you’re playing together, like you’re channeling something.  If someone isn’t in the same headspace, then the ESP feels disrupted.”

In August, The Black Angels headed to El Paso’s renowned Sonic Ranch. Located on 2,300 acres of pecan orchards bordering the Rio Grande and Mexico, the studio – the largest residential recording complex in the world – proved the ideal locale for the band’s aural adventurism.  

“It’s awesome to be out there, away from everything, and just be saturated in the music,” Maas says.  “You have nowhere else to go but the studio.  It was really healthy for us, a really healthy experience.”

Furthermore, the band’s choice of producer/mixer John Congleton allowed for an extra set of ears, not to mention a tie-breaking vote in the ever-democratic Black Angels hierarchy.

“When we work with a producer,” Bland says, “the hope is that they’ll give us that extra push that we need and that’s what John did. He became the fifth member.  It can be nerve-wracking working with someone you don’t really know but we felt like he was coming from where we were coming from.”

Positive vibrations shine through Indigo Meadow, with radiant new hues spilling out like a blindingly bright field of Texas bluebonnets over the Black Angels’ traditionally shadowy palette.  “I Hear Colors (Chromaesthesia),” in many ways the album’s centerpiece and overall sonic manifesto, is a 21st century trip as transcendent as any anthem in the psychedelic canon, while the wyrd folk-flavored closer, “Black Isn’t Black,” points towards heretofore unventured musical and emotional terrain.

“We make this music because it makes us feel good,” Maas says, “we hope – that it makes other people feel good.  People ask me what I do and I tell them I’m a music therapist.  It sounds completely ridiculous but that’s how I see myself, that’s how I see our band, that’s how I see music in general – as therapy for people. Without it, life would be so much harder.” 

“There are still some pretty evil songs on there,” reminds Bland.  “I like the juxtaposition of something sounding sweet but maybe there’s an underbelly to it, so if you dive in further you get the full story.”

To be sure, all is not moon pies and rainbows ‘round Indigo Meadow – this is The Black Angels after all.  Tracks like the high-powered “Don’t Play With Guns” and the post-traumatic acid-punk of “Broken Soldier” continue the band’s longstanding role as psychedelic provocateurs, exploring archetypal themes of wasteful wars, creeping paranoia, and the corruption of power to score a disorienting soundtrack to our own increasingly Strangelovian culture.

“There are a lot of fucked up things going on in this world,” Maas says.  “We’re lucky to have an outlet and a platform to acknowledge these issues.”   

Founded in 2004, The Black Angels have been the spearhead of the post-millennial psychedelic movement, picking up the mantle of their hometown’s long lysergic history and reinvigorating it with progressive political commentary and unrestrained creativity and ambition.  Like any great psychedelic family band worth its salt, they have also birthed their own cottage industry, from The Reverberation Appreciation Society label (home to numerous new psychedelicists as well as their own many extracurricular outings) to hosting the annual gathering of the tribes at the amazing Austin Psych Fest.  Now entering its sixth year, APF has proven the locus for today’s incredibly wide-ranging psych scene, as expansive and revolutionary and exhilarating now as at any moment since its 1960s zenith.  

“We took it upon ourselves to help expand the genre,” Maas says, “not just sonically but let other people around the world experience it. And then vice verse, bring psychedelic music from all over the world to Austin.”  

Indigo Meadow affirms The Black Angels’ spot at the forefront of what is looking like a third psychedelic golden age, as hypnogogic production, mysterious world music jams, and propulsive, primitive pulsebeats come to define the sound of modern rock music, from the always audacious underground all the way to the cultural mainline.

“I can see it bubbling right now,” says Bland.  “It needs to steam over.  It’d be pretty cool if we could do a little psych takeover.  Back in the early 2000s, when I heard the Strokes and the White Stripes on the radio, that really stood out to me.  It was different and it really inspired me.  I’d love for that to happen again, maybe with one of our songs, and for there to be a complete overhaul of how people listen to music again.”

“You get jealous in a good way,” Maas says of the modern psych boom, “so it pushes you.  It’s inspiring.  It’s great to see it, it’s great to be a part of it.  It reconfirms to us that we’re doing the right thing.”

With each new record, The Black Angels have consistently elevated their art, their creative voice becoming clearer and more distinct.  Indigo Meadow continues their extraordinary evolution, its monumental melodies and vast vision marking it as testament to the band’s full-throttle commitment to the psychedelic ethos of ritual, community and boundless experimentation.

“Music is a spiritual thing for us,” Maas says.  “It’s what’s kept our band united.  Music is our religion.  That word can be so dirty sometimes, but this music is our spirituality.  Without sounding too hippy-dippy about it.”

- February 2013

Roky Erickson


→ Official Website

Like Syd Barrett, a common point of reference, Roky Erickson rose to cult-hero status as much for his music as for his tragic personal life; in light of his legendary bouts with madness and mythic drug abuse, the influence exerted by his garage-bred psychedelia was often lost in the shuffle. Born Roger Kynard Erickson on July 15, 1947, in Dallas, TX, he began playing the piano at age five; by age 12, he had also taken up the guitar. The child of an architect and would-be opera singer, Erickson dropped out of high school to become a professional musician. In 1965, he penned his most famous composition, "You're Gonna Miss Me," which he first recorded with a group called the Spades. The song and his high, swooping tenor brought him to the attention of another area band, the psychedelia-influenced 13th Floor Elevators, whose lyricist and jug player Tommy Hall invited Erickson to join; the Elevators soon cut their own version of "You're Gonna Miss Me," and took the single to number 56 on the pop charts in 1966.

The record's success earned the 13th Floor Elevators a deal with International Artists, but as their fame grew, so did their notoriety with local law enforcement officials, who took exception to the group's heavy experimentation with (and public support of) marijuana and LSD. The Elevators became the subject of considerable police harassment, and after Erickson was arrested for the possession of one lone joint in 1969, he pleaded insanity to avoid a prison term. A three-and-a-half year stint in the state's Hospital for the Criminally Insane followed; Erickson was diagnosed as a schizophrenic, and subjected to extensive electroshock therapy, Thorazine, and other psychoactive treatments.

Though released from the hospital in 1973, Erickson was never the same person; he returned to performing with a new band, the Aliens, but his songs -- a series of horror film-influenced records including "Red Temple Prayer (Two-Headed Dog)," "Don't Shake Me Lucifer," and "I Walked with a Zombie" -- found little success. He did retain a devoted cult following, however, but his popularity was fully exploited by managers who took advantage of his instability to draw the singer into a series of unfair publishing contracts that resulted in a steady stream of unauthorized releases from which Erickson earned not a cent. In 1982, he signed a legal affidavit declaring that a Martian had taken residence in his body, and gradually disappeared from music as the decade wore on.

By the '90s, Erickson was struggling to survive on a $200 monthly Social Security stipend; after an arrest on mail theft charges (later dropped), he was re-institutionalized. In 1990, however, artists like R.E.M., ZZ Top, John Wesley Harding, and the Jesus and Mary Chain recorded his songs for the album Where the Pyramid Meets the Eye: A Tribute to Roky Erickson, which brought his work to a wider audience than ever before. In 1993, Erickson performed publicly for the first time in many years at the Austin Music Awards; a few months later, he returned to the studio with guitarists Charlie Sexton and the Butthole Surfers' Paul Leary to record a number of new songs. In 1995, Leary's bandmate King Coffey released Erickson's All That May Do My Rhyme on his Trance Syndicate label; four years later, Trance issued Never Say Goodbye, a collection of rare, private recordings or unreleased Erickson compositions. (Coffey claims Erickson told him he was the first person to ever give him a royalty check for his music.)

In 2001, Sumner Erickson, Roky's brother and a successful classical musician, obtained custody of Roky, who had fallen into poor health. Under Sumner's watch, Roky began receiving proper medical and dental care for the first time in years, as well as more effective treatment for his psychological problems. Sumner also set up a charitable trust to help finance his brother's care, and with the help of sympathetic lawyers, attempted to sort out the legal red tape that prevented Roky from being paid for his music. A fit and relatively lucid Roky Erickson began making occasional public appearances in Austin, TX, and in March 2005, Roky spoke as part of a panel discussion on the 13th Floor Elevators at the South by Southwest Music Conference. Roky also made a brief musical appearance with a reunited lineup of the Explosives, and a documentary on Erickson, You're Gonna Miss Me, premiered at the affiliated South by Southwest Film Festival. This burst of activity coincided with the release of I Have Always Been Here Before: The Roky Erickson Anthology, a two-disc career overview compilation. Halloween, a set of live recordings from 1979-1981 with the Explosives, was released in early 2008. The Will Sheff-produced True Love Cast Out All Evil, Erickson's first new studio album in some 14 years, appeared from Anti in 2010. ~ Jason Ankeny, Rovi

Golden Animals


→ Official Website

The Reverberation Appreciation Society is excited to announce Brooklyn desert-psych duo Golden Animals’ HEAR EYE GO, the Kickstarter-funded follow-up to their 2008 debut Free Your Mind and Win a Pony. The record will be released on Vinyl, CD, Cassette and Digital formats on September 24th, 2013.
Dividing their time between the extremes of Brooklyn and the California desert since their 2006 inception, longtime friends Tommy Eisner (vocals/guitar) and Linda Beecroft (drums/backing vocals) construct tales of love, friendship and seclusion while keeping their sound simultaneously energetic and meditative. They view their two home bases as complementary influences, shaping their sound equally but very differently.
 
Golden Animals’ commitment to the fruits of their labor is impressive—the band recorded an entire LP in a California cabin, only to scrap it upon finding that limitations on their recording process diminished the power of the tracks. That rigid commitment to their work is readily apparent throughout HEAR EYE GO's 10 tracks--they're exactly what they need to be, full of psych-garage energy and devoid of filler.
 
Despite its full-bodied sound, no bass guitars or organs were used in the record’s creation—it’s all drums and guitars. HEAR EYE GO was recorded by Matt Boynton (MGMT, Kurt Vile) at Vacation Island Recordings, and by the band themselves at their own studio. Joe LaPorta (Foo Fighters, Beach House) mastered the album at The Lodge.