Sat, Apr. 26th, 2014 · Mercy Lounge · $12 adv | $15 DOS

Damien Jurado with Adam Faucett

Sat, Apr. 26th, 2014

Damien Jurado with Adam Faucett

$12 adv | $15 DOS
Doors: 8:00pm
Show: 9:00pm
Ages: 18+
Mercy Lounge

Sat, Apr. 26th, 2014

Mercy Lounge
Doors: 8:00pm
Show: 9:00pm
Ages: 18+
$12 adv | $15 DOS
Get Tickets

Damien Jurado with Adam Faucett

Damien Jurado


→ Official Site

Damien Jurado's solo career began during the mid-1990s, releasing lo-fi folk based recordings on his own cassette-only label, Casa Recordings. Gaining a local cult following in Seattle, he was brought to the attention of Sub Pop Records by Sunny Day Real Estate singer Jeremy Enigk. After two 7" releases (Motorbike and Trampoline) Sub Pop issued his first full album, Waters Ave S in 1997. His second album Rehearsals for Departure, released in 1999, was a relative breakthrough. Produced by Ken Stringfellow (The Posies, Big Star), Jurado's second album established him as both a singer and songwriter of great ability.

He often makes use of found sound and field recording techniques, and has experimented with different forms of tape recordings. In 2000 he releasedPostcards and Audio Letters, a collection of found audio letters and fragments that he had found from sources such as thrift store tape players and answering machines. Also released in 2000 was Ghost of David, Jurado's bleakest and most personal sounding record to date. I Break Chairs (2002) was produced by long-time friend, Pedro the Lion's David Bazan. It was his last album for Sub Pop, and was a much rockier, electric affair. After signing for the Indiana-based label Secretly Canadian, Damien Jurado reverted to his trademark folk ballad-based style, releasing four more albums:Where Shall You Take Me? (2003), On My Way to Absence, (2005) And Now That I'm In Your Shadow (2006) and the rockier Caught in the Trees (2008)

Adam Faucett


→ Official Website

"Nothing can prepare you for the sound that comes out of his mouth when he sings—or bellows—his stellar songwriting. It is a soulful power beyond belief.”
-Paste Magazine
 
Hailing from Little Rock, Arkansas, and possessing a voice that the Onion A.V. Club warns “knocks your brain into the back of your skull”, Adam Faucett has drawn comparisons from Tim Buckley to Cat Power to Otis Redding.
 
Called “one of the greatest, most thoughtful lyricists the state has to offer.” (Arkansas Times) Faucett has again pushed the borders of his “part folk, part blues, part elemental rock stomp, part unidentifiable cosmic holler” (Arkansas Democrat Gazette) with the release Blind Water Finds Blind Water, a record of his most arresting and beautiful songs to date.
 
Faucett began performing solo in 2006 when the demise of Russellville, AR band Taught the Rabbits pushed him toward Chicago. He returned to Arkansas in 2007 to record his first solo album The Great Basking Shark, and began touring nationally. 2008’s Show Me Magic, Show Me Out followed, featuring Faucett’s band, The Tall Grass. A relentless touring schedule has led to shows with Jason Isbell, Damien Jurado, Chuck Ragan, and Lucero.
 
For the past two years, Adam has toured nationally and internationally in support of his third acclaimed release, More Like A Temple, which received praise from outlets including American Songwriter, Paste Magazine, No Depression and Uprooted Music Review. Temple also gained overseas support, landing at #14 on the EuroAmericana chart and receiving 5 stars from Altcountry.NL, bringing him to Europe for the first time.
 
From the opening note of the first track of Faucett’s new release Blind Water Finds Blind Water (Last Chance Records - 2014), it becomes clear that there is no holding back on this album. The emotionally raw “Day Drinker” sets the tone for a tour of unearthly themes set against the workaday backdrops of rural and suburban Arkansas. Sublime melodies mix tensely with characters who live in unsavory and haunted spaces. A Staten Island killer, an abusive ex-husband, and the 20th century "sleeping prophet" Edgar Cayce, all make appearances. Faucett, who says he “identifies more with the flood than the victims”, explains “the tunes of Blind Water take full responsibility for the irreversible damage.”
 
“Benton” and “Sparkman” reference two of the Arkansas towns where Adam spent his childhood, with the treatment of these stomping grounds blending reality and fiction to create Faucett’s own Arkansas Gothic vision. Deeply personal moments "Opossum", "Poet Song", and "Walking Home Late" are, according to Faucett, “all almost word for word true autobiographical accounts of my life in the not-so-Southern, not-so-Midwestern bastard state of mind that is Central Arkansas. This record, written on the run physically and emotionally, is a mapping of a moment guided by the whim and mercy of others. Water, blind and helpless moves not where it wants but where it’s allowed.”